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Fatumas Voice Latest Questions

  • 1
Mya Keli
Chui

Why don’t we respect people’s pronouns?


I know Kenya is a very religious nation and we now have a religious government that may even be more harsh on people who identify differently. Which brings me to the question about why we don’t respect people’s preferred pronouns?


The pronouns.org site explains it best: Using someone’s correct personal pronouns is a way to respect them and create an inclusive environment, just as using a person’s name can be a way to respect them. Just as it can be offensive or even harassing to make up a nickname for someone and call them that nickname against their will, it can be offensive or harassing to guess at someone’s pronouns and refer to them using those pronouns if that is not how that person wants to be known.


Or, worse, actively choosing to ignore the pronouns someone has stated that they go by could imply the oppressive notion that intersex, transgender, nonbinary, and gender nonconforming people do not or should not exist. When we refer to “personal” pronouns, we don’t mean that these pronouns are necessarily private information (generally they are not), we mean that they are pronouns referring to a unique and individual person.

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Best Answer

  1. Brenda Gutu
    Best Answer
    This answer was edited.

    This conversation is very important. What I know is that religion has been used as a tool to justify the oppression of others who are unlike us. And stemming from cultural beliefs and reinforced by religion, people who are transgender, intersex, or basically on the LGBTQIA+ spectrum have been ignoreRead more

    This conversation is very important. What I know is that religion has been used as a tool to justify the oppression of others who are unlike us. And stemming from cultural beliefs and reinforced by religion, people who are transgender, intersex, or basically on the LGBTQIA+ spectrum have been ignored, overlooked and are a hidden population obviously why? Discrimination.

    I believe it begins with us, to create awareness by displaying our pronouns in this platform then we can begin to sensitize ourselves among us in this platform then we can learn to make it a part of our conversations in our day to day life.

    For example by asking, “How do you identify yourself? How would you prefer to be addressed? Rather, what are your pronouns?”

    People might give the, “Huh” expression, but that is an opportunity to explain more… Like…

    “I identify as she/her/hers, what are your pronouns?”

    Well, it should be a natural conversation, not forceful. People can choose to identify themselves or not depending on how comfortable a person is with you.

    One time, a person chose to confide in me that they prefer to identify as she, her, they; but, as she, her, hers with strangers. I appreciate that kind of discourse because it shows that people have to feel a sense of trust to identify their pronouns to another person or group.

    Also education around this is important because some people might identify as she, her, hers but their sexual orientation is bi for example. It is not upto us to judge and fill in other people’s pronouns, it is up to them. Their identity.

    I believe that education around sexuality beyond the binary is a conversation that many people in Africa are demonizing. You are right. Religion is one of the factors. Used to oppress others. ‘We are better than them’, ‘We are holier than them’, ‘They will burn in eternal fire’, ‘We are as pure and white as snow’, Blah Blah Blah…. Religion is a tool of oppression period.

    What I know is that I respect people equally, be you the President of the United States, be you the child in the room, be you the drunkard roaming the streets, be you the homeless person in the street, be you Jesus of Nazareth, I respect people equally because the higher power I believe in sees all as equals and LOVE as the purest form of RELIGION.

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1 Answer

  1. Brenda Gutu
    Best Answer
    This answer was edited.

    This conversation is very important. What I know is that religion has been used as a tool to justify the oppression of others who are unlike us. And stemming from cultural beliefs and reinforced by religion, people who are transgender, intersex, or basically on the LGBTQIA+ spectrum have been ignoreRead more

    This conversation is very important. What I know is that religion has been used as a tool to justify the oppression of others who are unlike us. And stemming from cultural beliefs and reinforced by religion, people who are transgender, intersex, or basically on the LGBTQIA+ spectrum have been ignored, overlooked and are a hidden population obviously why? Discrimination.

    I believe it begins with us, to create awareness by displaying our pronouns in this platform then we can begin to sensitize ourselves among us in this platform then we can learn to make it a part of our conversations in our day to day life.

    For example by asking, “How do you identify yourself? How would you prefer to be addressed? Rather, what are your pronouns?”

    People might give the, “Huh” expression, but that is an opportunity to explain more… Like…

    “I identify as she/her/hers, what are your pronouns?”

    Well, it should be a natural conversation, not forceful. People can choose to identify themselves or not depending on how comfortable a person is with you.

    One time, a person chose to confide in me that they prefer to identify as she, her, they; but, as she, her, hers with strangers. I appreciate that kind of discourse because it shows that people have to feel a sense of trust to identify their pronouns to another person or group.

    Also education around this is important because some people might identify as she, her, hers but their sexual orientation is bi for example. It is not upto us to judge and fill in other people’s pronouns, it is up to them. Their identity.

    I believe that education around sexuality beyond the binary is a conversation that many people in Africa are demonizing. You are right. Religion is one of the factors. Used to oppress others. ‘We are better than them’, ‘We are holier than them’, ‘They will burn in eternal fire’, ‘We are as pure and white as snow’, Blah Blah Blah…. Religion is a tool of oppression period.

    What I know is that I respect people equally, be you the President of the United States, be you the child in the room, be you the drunkard roaming the streets, be you the homeless person in the street, be you Jesus of Nazareth, I respect people equally because the higher power I believe in sees all as equals and LOVE as the purest form of RELIGION.

    See less