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Fatumas Voice Latest Questions

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Nahashon Kimemia
Nyati

Why are some Christians & the LGBT comunity turning Binyavanga’s death into a debate on homosexuality?

Did homosexuality define Binyavanga’s entire life? Why are some Christians defining him by that only? Why is the LGBT community taking advantage of his death to demonize Christianity? Shouldn’t we paint him as a man without fault? Should we celebrate him as a man who kept struggling through his faults?

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1 Him Answer

  1. Most of us are lost and only seek validity in others. Sometimes when this doesn’t come, it pushes us to put down others so that we may feel a false sense of elevation. We are so petty and confused. Even the very God that we serve said “Forgive them for they know not what they are doing.”

    Most of us are lost and only seek validity in others. Sometimes when this doesn’t come, it pushes us to put down others so that we may feel a false sense of elevation. We are so petty and confused. Even the very God that we serve said “Forgive them for they know not what they are doing.”

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2 Answers

  1. The answer is simple – vanity. Many young Kenyans are plagued by vanity, especially those you see active on social media debates usually of little constructive value. Most Kenyans have Twitter as their only locus of dignity – they judge their value by the followers they have and the retweets they geRead more

    The answer is simple – vanity.
    Many young Kenyans are plagued by vanity, especially those you see active on social media debates usually of little constructive value. Most Kenyans have Twitter as their only locus of dignity – they judge their value by the followers they have and the retweets they get – all is vanity.
    Celebrity culture never benefits those called celebrities nor those who follow them. A celebrity dies today he’ll trend for a day or two, after that he/she is forgotten and people move on to the next ‘conversation-worthy’ thing. We are going to have a generational calamity in 15-20 years time where all these ‘fools’ of youth will be the adults tasked with running this country.

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    • Yes, Robert, I agree. Vanity is a cause of so many problems in Kenya including this situation. I also believe that the pursuit of vanity is an attempt to fill an emptiness that exists within us. What is this emptiness? Where is it there? I believe that we have shifted focus from our souls. Instead, we concentrate on our senses. They require immediate gratification so that is what we seek. I would also dare to argue that homosexuality is the pursuit of vanity. These relationships are in vain. They cannot lead to reproduction and people mimicing such relationships (one-sex arrangements) cannot reproduce as well. They end in nothing. However, they exist because people are trying to fill a void. I believe Binyavanga was trying to do that. Also, those who demonize him or the LGBT community are trying to fill an empty space as well because a holier than thou attitude is an act of vanity.

  2. Kenyans never have any respect for the dead. We politicise death and make insensitive comments without considering close family and friends who are mourning. However, on the flip side, I feel like Binyavanga would have wanted justvthis to happen. The untouched conversation about LGBTQ in Kenya. AndRead more

    Kenyans never have any respect for the dead. We politicise death and make insensitive comments without considering close family and friends who are mourning. However, on the flip side, I feel like Binyavanga would have wanted justvthis to happen. The untouched conversation about LGBTQ in Kenya. And it’s even better than its Christians talking. This is something he fought for. Lives for. And would have probably does for…

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    • Manser, I agree… Kenyans never have any respect for the dead. I was happy when Aisha interrupted Sifuna the other day as he was using the funeral podium as an ODM platform. I know that she did it for political reasons, but I was happy all the same. Yes, I also feel that Binyavanga would have wanted that to happen. However, I do not feel that the conversation about the LGBTQ community is untouched, perhaps unresolved. Also, I do not believe the discussion will end the way the community wants it to conclude. Thus far, there is no argument in support of homosexuality and as such, society will always revolt against it. There is a case for not regulating morality. Sometimes, we interpret a cry for help as a cause we should fight for in life. I feel that Binyavanga was crying for help, but no one ever saw that. The LGBTQ community and the Christians interpreted it to suit their agenda. In the end, he was alone in his torment. Its just my opinion.