Hello,

Join Fatuma's Voice, Sign Up to get started!

Welcome Back,

Join Fatuma's Voice, log in to continue.

Forgot Password,

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.

Sorry, you do not have permission to ask a question, You must login to ask a question. Please subscribe to paid membership

Please briefly explain why you feel this question should be reported.

Please briefly explain why you feel this answer should be reported.

Please briefly explain why you feel this user should be reported.

Fatumas Voice Latest Questions

  • 0
  • 0
Sallu Kamuskay

When will we drop the tradition and put an end to FGM and the cutting of girls?

I have this personal opinion on the current crisis in the world ( Africa) on the FGM campaigns mostly led by women who are victims or see it as inhuman practice, at least to serve my conscience and on the basis I am a human being, and that I have sisters and hoping to have child or children in …

You must login to add an answer.

1 Her Answer

  1. I did a research on implications of FGM in Kenya case study Samburu county, l can say from the outcome of my research there's alot that the state and non state actors have done to eradicate FGM. We are almost there, many communities have embrace alternative rite of passage and they are slowly doingRead more

    I did a research on implications of FGM in Kenya case study Samburu county, l can say from the outcome of my research there’s alot that the state and non state actors have done to eradicate FGM. We are almost there, many communities have embrace alternative rite of passage and they are slowly doing away with FGM.

    See less

1 Answer

  1. This tradition is still going on today not because of lack of awareness but because the communities involved still cling on to it regardless of the negative impact. Maybe if it is criminalised we can see it reducing or even stopping for good.

    This tradition is still going on today not because of lack of awareness but because the communities involved still cling on to it regardless of the negative impact. Maybe if it is criminalised we can see it reducing or even stopping for good.

    See less