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Robert Mũnũku
Chui

What do you think of ‘mob justice’?

Today when returning home from a meeting I found a crowd gathered on the street. On closer investigation, I saw a man with a swollen bloody face being pushed around. He was bleeding. One man, in a tattered white hat said, “Usimchape, si vizuri, tumpeleke station [let’s not beat him up, it is not right, let us instead take him to the police station].” Another, a man from my building, said, “Chapa hii ng’ombe ya binadamu [Beat up this cow of a human being].”

Apparently he had stolen firewood from a nearby cut-down tree (though I wonder why the trees were being felled in the first place & if the property owners had the requisite permissions to do so).

What is your take on ‘mob justice’? I feel mob injustice is more accurate. People in the country are edgy, they are angry at life, others and themselves. Such wanton aggression is testimony to this. Don’t get me wrong, stealing is definitely wrong, but I feel the reaction to it is a separate psychological phenomenon. I believe it is ‘deferred aggression’ made manifest.

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3 Her Answers

  1. Mob justice in my opinion is very wrong, if someone has done something wrong he or she should be arrested and arraign to court so that justice can be served.

    Mob justice in my opinion is very wrong, if someone has done something wrong he or she should be arrested and arraign to court so that justice can be served.

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  2. Is a practice whereby a mob takes the law into their own hands in order to injure or kill a person accused of wrongdoing.

    Is a practice whereby a mob takes the law into their own hands in order to injure or kill a person accused of wrongdoing.

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  3. mob justice is not right. we are in a country governed by the rule of law and nobody has the right to play judge and jury to perpetrators. In my opinion, it is inhuman to take the law into our hands.

    mob justice is not right. we are in a country governed by the rule of law and nobody has the right to play judge and jury to perpetrators. In my opinion, it is inhuman to take the law into our hands.

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2 His Answers

  1. The rise in mob justice is usually an indication of lack of faith in the justice system. When crime becomes rampant, the people question the work of security authorities. They feel the security authorities are not doing enough to rein in on insecurity and so they choose to do so themselves.

    The rise in mob justice is usually an indication of lack of faith in the justice system. When crime becomes rampant, the people question the work of security authorities. They feel the security authorities are not doing enough to rein in on insecurity and so they choose to do so themselves.

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  2. Mob justice is a very wrong way of restoring sanity within a community or society. Even though people think that mob justice will scare away those who are trying to commit crimes, sometimes they get the wrong person and they end up killing them.

    Mob justice is a very wrong way of restoring sanity within a community or society. Even though people think that mob justice will scare away those who are trying to commit crimes, sometimes they get the wrong person and they end up killing them.

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1 Answer

  1. Mob justice is a denial of justice especially since the once administering it do not have the expertise to determine whether the victims are really offenders.

    Mob justice is a denial of justice especially since the once administering it do not have the expertise to determine whether the victims are really offenders.

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