Hello,

Join Fatuma's Voice, Sign Up to get started!

Welcome Back,

Join Fatuma's Voice, log in to continue.

Forgot Password,

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.

Sorry, you do not have permission to ask a question, You must login to ask a question. Please subscribe to paid membership

Please briefly explain why you feel this question should be reported.

Please briefly explain why you feel this answer should be reported.

Please briefly explain why you feel this user should be reported.

Fatumas Voice Latest Questions

  • 1
  • 1
Sophie

Would it be possible to give a human artificial gills?

Would it be possible to give a human artificial gills, capable of allowing humans to breathe underwater (with no outside source of oxygen except from H2O)?

You must login to add an answer.

Best Answer

  1. Brenda Gutu
    Best Answer

    If animals living under water need only a small amount of oxygen to live, I am curious how much oxygen a human needs to live and how much of that can be extracted from water and which technology would have that capability. Also considerations would have to be made for fresh or salty water bodies andRead more

    If animals living under water need only a small amount of oxygen to live, I am curious how much oxygen a human needs to live and how much of that can be extracted from water and which technology would have that capability. Also considerations would have to be made for fresh or salty water bodies and anoxic water areas.

    See less

2 Her Answers

  1. Nope. Water contains less than 1% of the oxygen (as dissolved O2) that our bodies need for life. (Dissolved oxygen is the only form available to life; the oxygen in molecular H2O being chemically inaccessible.) No Gill structure that could conceivably be fitted to a human being could draw anything lRead more

    Nope.

    Water contains less than 1% of the oxygen (as dissolved O2) that our bodies need for life. (Dissolved oxygen is the only form available to life; the oxygen in molecular H2O being chemically inaccessible.)

    No Gill structure that could conceivably be fitted to a human being could draw anything like enough breath for human life.

    See less
  2. Interesting one. Sharks are bigger than humans and manage with gills. I suspect the answer is no, because sharks and fish are poikilothermic, they adopt the temperature of their surroundings whereas humans and other mammals are homeothermic – they maintain a constant body temperature. There’s a hugeRead more

    Interesting one. Sharks are bigger than humans and manage with gills. I suspect the answer is no, because sharks and fish are poikilothermic, they adopt the temperature of their surroundings whereas humans and other mammals are homeothermic – they maintain a constant body temperature. There’s a huge difference in energy and therefore oxygen requirements. Humans burn smoking amounts of oxygen and food just to stay warm. You could have gills, but you’d have to be cold blooded.

    And you wouldn’t be able to make enough energy to power a human brain, a seriously power hungry organ. So you wouldn’t be human…

    See less

3 Him Answers

  1. The theoretical answer is yes, but such an apparatus would be enormous, heavy, and use a huge amount of power.

    The theoretical answer is yes, but such an apparatus would be enormous, heavy, and use a huge amount of power.

    See less
  2. Theoretically you could make such a device, but in order to extract enough oxygen to supply a human’s needs from just the water, the device would have to bigger than the human. (Even if you could miniaturize all the components, the volume of water you’d need to pass through it would result in a flowRead more

    Theoretically you could make such a device, but in order to extract enough oxygen to supply a human’s needs from just the water, the device would have to bigger than the human. (Even if you could miniaturize all the components, the volume of water you’d need to pass through it would result in a flow rate that would have lethal consequences for any human wearing the thing)

    At which point you might as well put your human INSIDE the device and call it a submarine.

    See less
  3. The other answers all refer to extracting the Oxygen gas dissolved in the water. How about electrolyzing the water to get O2 and H2 gases? I have not made any calculation but the size of the apparatus will be much smaller (provided you have a suitable power source). The remaining problem would thanRead more

    The other answers all refer to extracting the Oxygen gas dissolved in the water.

    How about electrolyzing the water to get O2 and H2 gases? I have not made any calculation but the size of the apparatus will be much smaller (provided you have a suitable power source).

    The remaining problem would than be how to dilute the pure oxygen (to about 20% volume) to be breathable. It is well known that oxygen can be diluted with Helium, to replace Nitrogen for deep diving. However, the only other gas available from the electrolysis process is Hydrogen. I have no idea if breathing a mixture of 80% hydrogen with 20% Oxygen is safe. Does anyone of the readers know?

    See less

1 Answer

  1. Brenda Gutu
    Best Answer

    If animals living under water need only a small amount of oxygen to live, I am curious how much oxygen a human needs to live and how much of that can be extracted from water and which technology would have that capability. Also considerations would have to be made for fresh or salty water bodies andRead more

    If animals living under water need only a small amount of oxygen to live, I am curious how much oxygen a human needs to live and how much of that can be extracted from water and which technology would have that capability. Also considerations would have to be made for fresh or salty water bodies and anoxic water areas.

    See less