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Stacy Wambui
Chui

Why is eating pork a taboo in some religions and cultures?

Some religions and cultures see pigs as unclean animals and pork or the flesh of swine is forbidden unless one is starving to death. One of the reasons given is the dirty habits and unclean nature of pigs, along with the fact that they don’t chew their cud which makes them hosts for some parasites and worms that can jump into man through undercooked pork and cause diseases. Other domestic animals also pose the same threat so what made pork a taboo?

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1 Her Answer

  1. Eating pork is considered taboo in some religions and cultures for a variety of reasons. In Islam, pork is considered haram (forbidden) because it is believed to be unclean and impure. In Judaism, pork is considered non-kosher because pigs do not meet the criteria of being a cloven-hoofed, cud-chewiRead more

    Eating pork is considered taboo in some religions and cultures for a variety of reasons. In Islam, pork is considered haram (forbidden) because it is believed to be unclean and impure. In Judaism, pork is considered non-kosher because pigs do not meet the criteria of being a cloven-hoofed, cud-chewing animal. In some cultures, such as Hinduism and certain sects of Buddhism, pork is avoided due to beliefs about the spiritual impurity of consuming meat from certain animals.

    Additionally, in some societies, the taboo against eating pork may have originated as a way to prevent the spread of diseases that can be transmitted through the consumption of undercooked pork, such as trichinosis. Over time, these religious and cultural taboos have become ingrained in the beliefs and practices of these communities, leading to the continued avoidance of pork as a food source.

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1 Answer

  1. At the end of the day it is about personal preference. If the only good available is Pork, I would eat it to survive regardless of what my religion or beliefs say about it.

    At the end of the day it is about personal preference. If the only good available is Pork, I would eat it to survive regardless of what my religion or beliefs say about it.

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