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agba

Which is the most committed NATO member?

When Russia invaded the Crimean peninsula in 2014, NATO members pledged to spend 2% of their GDP on military defence. Only 7 countries (UK, Greece, US, Poland, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) have reached this target. Of these countries, which one would you say is has the most commitment to the pledge?

Poll Results

0%UK
100%Greece ( 1 voter )
0%US
0%Poland
0%Estonia
0%Latvia
0%Lithuania
Based On 1 Votes

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2 Answers

  1. Some countries spent up to 4% of their GDP on defence during the cold war, which is still a significantly small amount to pay for deterrence, compared to what they would need to spend in case a possible war breaks out.

    Some countries spent up to 4% of their GDP on defence during the cold war, which is still a significantly small amount to pay for deterrence, compared to what they would need to spend in case a possible war breaks out.

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  2. The main challenge with the rest of the countries seems to be about getting support from the country. The money also ends up benefiting a few companies and countries who provide most of the weapons, which does not sit well with some of the members, even though they are aware of the need. Some have eRead more

    The main challenge with the rest of the countries seems to be about getting support from the country. The money also ends up benefiting a few companies and countries who provide most of the weapons, which does not sit well with some of the members, even though they are aware of the need. Some have even agreed that the 2% is even too low but still haven’t managed to hit the 2% mark.

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