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Bee M
Chui

Are we really proud to be Africans?

A few weeks ago, the majority of residents of one of Zimbabwe’s affluent areas rejected using Shona or Ndebele names, opting for English names only and the argument was that using names using our vernacular makes the area loses it’s value as they felt our mother tongue had low value. The few who wanted to include our languages as a representation of our culture were ignored completely.

I was horrified I had to make a video about it. It saddens me that we still think this was about ourselves. Why do we look down on ourselves as Africans? Or do we?

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Best Answer

  1. Please share a link to the video.

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2 Her Answers

  1. On the other side, white people and black Americans are adopting African names. For them this means much more because most inherited slave names and this is the closest they can identify with their African roots. It is sad to hear this and I hope that it is an isolated incident.

    On the other side, white people and black Americans are adopting African names. For them this means much more because most inherited slave names and this is the closest they can identify with their African roots. It is sad to hear this and I hope that it is an isolated incident.

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  2. Please share a link to the video.

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1 Answer

  1. African pride is not something that we can give up intentionally or simply aquire in case we don't have it. African pride is ingrained in our being. It is the very essence of our life and our ansestors passed it down to us along with the dance, the art, the rhythm, the resilience... Our brains may fRead more

    African pride is not something that we can give up intentionally or simply aquire in case we don’t have it. African pride is ingrained in our being. It is the very essence of our life and our ansestors passed it down to us along with the dance, the art, the rhythm, the resilience…

    Our brains may forget it because of the lives we are forced to live for survival but the essence is implanted in out DNA and flows through our blood.

    Even though we may suppress it, it will forever roar though us in ways we can never understand or through our children who will be braver and have much more courage than we do.

    This may not always be the case and we should not take it for granted. Even the sun sets and once we loose this energy that resides in our being, we may never manage to get it back. That’s why it is important to educate ourselves and make sure we do our best as if we are the last of our race so that our children won’t have to go through the same pain and suffering we are experiencing.

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