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[Deleted User]

How connected is today’s millennial to culture and history?

I’ve read some of your articles where you’ve referenced civic activity in your family background. How has closer access to this information impacted your view of the world and what would you have missed without it?

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1 Him Answer

  1. A very good & timely question. Again, looking at Kenya, our documented history, as is our political one, is very much an infant if we were to use such an analogy to compare it with other countries. We are only turning 60 next year (2023) as a self-organized political economy with citizens. CompaRead more

    A very good & timely question.

    Again, looking at Kenya, our documented history, as is our political one, is very much an infant if we were to use such an analogy to compare it with other countries.

    We are only turning 60 next year (2023) as a self-organized political economy with citizens. Compare that to USA whose history is now aged centuries…

    Another factor to consider is that unlike many African countries Kenya is quite diverse as far as ethnicity race go (compared to say Rwanda). Another thing to consider is the ‘divide and rule’ tactic used by the first 2 presidents who exploited this reality to sow the first seeds of what is today full-blown tribalism.

    Lastly, consider that during the centralised province system (8) almost everyone moved to Nairobi from the rural areas to look for work. The first families to settle and raise their children in Nairobi formed the first cohort of Kenya’s urban middle-class and their children, unlike those who remained or were predominantly raised in rural areas. This new urban population was privy to information at a time which had limited access to radio and TV despite very few households affording them. Even those that did only accessed local content via VOK up until 1990 when KTN emerged as the only other channel (which then introduced CNN giving more access to the outside world). As a person who was born in Nairobi these realities played a big role in my upbringing.

    Leader’s Quest (Mau Mau Arts): https://youtu.be/okCj8NSfuQk

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